Spotlight: Manajel Embroidery

In addition to the weaving techniques, another traditional craft practiced in the Bedouin community is a type...

Spotlight: Manajel Embroidery

In addition to the weaving techniques, another traditional craft practiced in the Bedouin community is a type of embroidery called Manajel (sickle in Arabic). In the past, the Manajel stitch was a seam stitch used to decoratively attach together the different pieces of fabric in a dress, and the Bedouin also utilized it for the binding together of rug pieces when their looms were too thin. It is a highly time and thread-consuming needlework as the stitches need to be very close to one another for it to appear as a single strip of embroidery. Our Manajel pieces are hand-embroidered by Miriam and her sister Aziza, who we’ve worked with since the launch of our brand. Miriam is from the Bedouin village of Lakiya in the Negev Desert and her sister lives in the city of Rahat, the only Bedouin settlement in Israel with official city status. They are both parts of the “Desert Embroidery” workshop run by the Bedouin women of the village, founded for the purpose of supporting the Palestinian-Bedouin woman in the Negev area by providing them with employment and education while preserving their folk art heritage. Another type of Manajel stitch we use at ADISH is called A‘qided Gazeh, which was traditionally applied as a joining seam for the dress worn in the Gaza area.

 

We worked with Miriam and Aziza to create the Majadalwi Pockets Button Jacket, which includes eight Manajel stitches on the front, back, and sleeves, with blue embroidery thread. The jacket is being stocked at Joyce in Hong Kong, Voo Store in Berlin, and Black store in Copenhagen.